Culture

“Fashioned from Nature”: can nature and fashion coexist?

07.05.2018

If you want to get a taste of one of the most recent and hot topics regarding the world of fashion, the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A) is holding an exhibition on the relationship between fashion and the environment.

Fashioned from Nature.

300 pieces. 400 years. We are now becoming more and more addicted to fashion, but will be there a time in which we will ever be addicted to nature? Fashioned from Nature explores what goes down in the world of manufacturing, whether it is exuberant high-end garments being produced or fast fashion.

What are the ethical implications of what we wear on the world around us? The matter goes beyond topics such as fur coats: the pieces on show put together something like a hat in suede and Himalayan monal pheasant with mass-produced clothing. Which of them has more impact on the environment?

Well, the environmental cost of fashion, especially fast fashion and its request of reducing costs of production is related to cutting corners, which straight translates into water pollution and a huge amount of textile waste.

Not only that. Fashioned from Nature might also have the most reflecting on the amount of chemicals we actually end up wearing, your kids are exposed to as well, and the consequences which derive from this long term .

We are obsessed with healthy food, but do we pay as much attention to what we expose our bodies to when it comes to wearing the latest print, or the most vibrant summer pattern?

But even if you don’t go for fast fashion, you might end up as a ‘victim of fashion’ either way: a Greenpeace campaign  aimed at making people aware of the fact fast fashion also contributes to the greenhouse effect and to destroying our oceans, with plastic fibres flowing in after every cycle of ‘polyester’ washing.

Un post condiviso da Patagonia (@patagonia) in data:

Eco-friendly and sustainable fashion

Something can be done. In 2018 technology isn’t futuristic, a real change is possible.

Wasting less, we already knew that.

But what about making of that waste a prime resource for creating beautiful garments? Patagonia made a fleece in 100% recycled plastic bottles and then in 2018 announced a switch to only two fabrics, either organic cotton or a blend or recycled polyester and organic cotton.

And soon enough fast fashion brands such as H&M have followed this environmental conscious initiative: at Fashioned from Nature you will be able to see their Conscious collection, which is made from 100% plastic recovered from the oceans.

Or the Nike’s Flyknit Racer trainers, also on display:  at Fashioned from Nature you will be able to see  these shoes, developed with a super technological computer trick that allows to half manufacturing waste, as each panel is knitted to the exact size.

Un post condiviso da andrie0301 (@andrie0301) in data:

Edwina Ehrman, curator of the exhibition stated in an interview with Vogue:

I think my aim is that one day sustainability is no longer seen as something special. It shouldn’t be a luxury, it should be every day, it should be absolutely hotwired right from the very, very beginning.

One thing is for sure: if we are drawn to sustainable fashion as much as we are constantly looking for superfoods, new healthy regimes and fitness packages that claim that can change our lives, helping nature to preserve itself might not be such a daunting and impossible task. It could become our future.

EKOCYCLE™ was launched by hip hop superstar will.i.am back in 2014, one that fancies anything super tech, drives only Tesla and puts in his music videos as much as there is related to Artificial Intelligence as possible. He did it with The Coca-Cola Company, and he explained what the aim is in these words:

With the EKOCYCLE brand, I’m on a mission to educate and inspire consumers around the globe to seek out more sustainable lifestyle choices that will ultimately play a part in the movement toward a world with zero waste

Un post condiviso da i.am/theSUN (@iamwill) in data:

Maybe after all, a culture of recycling for fashion and for nature is in the making.