Style

Milan Fashion Week Fall/Winter 2019 highlights

18.03.2019

From Karl Lagerfeld’s last collection to Gucci’s carnivalesque catwalk parade; from bold colours to a party of neutrals: from the official runways shows to the presentations shows not to be missed; the looks that stopped the show and got front rowers’ attention and our film of the best of it all, including the most striking streetstyle looks and what happened while guests turned up.

Here’s all you need to remember from Milan Fashion Week Fall/Winter 2019.

Courtesy of Chicco Jiang and Tigre

Annakiki’s colours

She’s not afraid of colours or of fabrics that can have heads turning, but how would you even try and make canary yellow and pink work together just fine, actually, superbly? Or tons of vinyl, from tyffany green to pink as well as animal prints, including black and white for snake and zebra, work all together and say the opposite of clash?

 

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Moncler’s 11 collections

Moncler did Milan Fashion Week proud with not one but eleven different collections, all of which were presented differently but all in the railways arches under the lines north of Milan’s central station.  This work of art is from the Moncler 1 Pierpaolo Piccioli.

 

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Gucci’s Venice Carnival

“We all have a savage, animal part of us inside, I feel like someone who tries to adhere to the rules and someone who is also wild”

The setting itself of Alessandro Michele’s storytelling for Gucci FW19 fashion show was no masquerade, as it made one thing clear; he can put up a show. With more than 120,000 LED light bulbs forming an ‘almost blinding’ elliptical wall, which was connected to a 100 meter long runway, curved and mirrored. The distortion of reality was the real takeaway from the show, as much as Michele’s inventions. Gold ears, inspired by the 24-karat gold work ‘Fashion Fiction’ by Eduardo Costa, chockers filled with long and sharp spikes as to represent a post apocalyptic scenario; then the series of jumpers with ‘ironic’ phrases embroidered on the back, to go on with colour layering, elongated shirt collars and plenty of crystal and beads adorning some of his pieces.

 

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Jil Sander

Clean, polished, minimalistic, but ethereal at the same time. Flowy, impalpable the game of neutrals for the women of Jil Sander’s Fall Winter 2019

 

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Max Mara’s big coats at Bocconi

Big were the coats and bigger the colours of the looks presented during Max Mara’s Fashion show; if on one side there was the comfort of a head-to-toe vanilla look, on the other it was all about teddy bear technicolor coats. What they shared was their cut, big and oversized.

 

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Dondup’s 20s party scene

Femininity and elegance dress differently at Dondup, and their presentation show was a celebration in the celebration, an ode to the 20s party glam, a tribute held at a likewise opulent – in the looks – decor; red, black, gold and silver plus sequins and zodiac inspired embroidery on stunningly tailored dresses, overcoats and the masculine three piece suit.

Dolce & Gabbana’s return to elegance

Brocade, red velvet, sequins, gold floral prints on glossy satin and all that undisputed talent in tailoring garments that flatter with absolute grace the body of woman in  Dolce & Gabbana’s strip back to their essence, giving their service to fashion. After all, it isn’t a bad way to get back on track and who to look out for – for the good reasons – after their glitch with being racist in China.

 

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GDCS’ pretty in pink palazzo

From pink sweaters featuring the famous Italian pasta brand, the latest of the brands that got turned into fashion statements – remember Fendi’s Alitalia — to pink plush sweaters for her or heart shaped bags in bubble gum pink, the streetwear luxury brand has brought a breath of fresh and irreverent air on the runway.

 

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Moschino’s The Price is Right show

Jeremy Scott looks like he is never dry of rebellious ideas and he was at it again with his iron shaped evening bags, there was also a cash register, a dress shaped like a meal and ‘One Moschino Dollar’ paper note purse, all in the name of creating a fashion-game show, recalling his 2001 collection.

“There’s always shit in everyone’s life,. A little levity, a little bit of fun—there’s nothing wrong with it. I am the king of camp.” 

he said to the press.

 

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Versace’s perfect imperfections

A little bit of imperfection is the new perfection

Donatella Versace’ words before the presentation. As Versace was recently acquired by Michael Kors holding, names Capri Holdings in January, the boost seen on the runway was in creating garments palatable for a younger type of clientele, who is now very much into 1990s grunge. But do not fear Kurt Cobain’s flannel shirts, as Versace took everything to planet sophistication, even if it was kinder-whore style the matter they wanted to be dealing with.

 

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Prada’s unbroken Frankenstein

Miuccia Prada’s fashion monster came alive for a second time on the runway after a first apparition in January; Frankenstein was conveyed in the shape of leather harnesses, juxtaposed with graphic rose prints, embodying the compelling patchwork he is.

 

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Karl Lagerfeld’s last Fendi

It was an extremely emotional show for Fendi as the last ever collection by the late Karl Lagerfeld; it had all his high Edwardian collars that the creative director wore himself in some of his most iconic looks. The rendition of the double F logo, which he invented in 1981, featured Karl Lagerfeld’s handwriting and inserted into the collection subtly, for example woven into hosiery.

His lifetime collaborators and those who he help build a successful career said the very last goodbye to the king of fashion.

 

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