© By Zoo as Zoo courtesy of Dashboard
Wellbeing

Sensorial dining experiences taking food to the next level

14.01.2019 | By ELENA LONGARI

When it comes to food the feel is that there’s no more room for creativity as the competition between Michelin stared restaurants to come up with unexpected flavours combinations seems to have saturated the scene with dishes we don’t really know what to make of them. And that is why the rise of so called ‘dining experiences’ is what we will be looking at today: stimulating all senses with incredible visuals and variations of food as we normally think of it, the rise of restaurants and dining events is proof there’s still a way to take food to another next level.  

Glow in dark ramen dining experience

The impact of watching food glowing in the dark is worth alone the experience, but the project by Nakamura.ke and Dashboard is a total immersion in creativity: a mobile kitchen venue will take for the first time up to 6 guests on a different sensorial and emotional journey thanks also to the folklore and storytelling the award -winning chefs and designers have put together.

 

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Debuting in January in two locations in Atlanta, GA, the glow in the dark ramen experience is a very exclusive event, as most seats have already sold out: those who haven’t been able to get tickets can still access purchase nightly party at the door at the Sound Table & Space2, where the experience will continue with the ‘Yokai’. The Japanese spirits are from the Nakamuras-a family, who were able to turn the dining experience they would offer in their ramen business into a carnival. This was hundred and nine years ago and has inspired a whole team of creatives to put together what can only be described as the frontier of the new going out for a meal!

By Zoo as Zoo courtesy of Dashboard
By Zoo as Zoo courtesy of Dashboard

Bad Taste’s colour meals

Red, yellow, white, pink and black monochrome dishes are instead the different take on the human sense conceived by Bad Taste, a project based in Brooklyn. Tomato, scallion cream and tobiko roe make the Red Russian combinations of reds on a plate or the chawanmushi with chicken, served in eggshell out of an incubator are components of the white meal.

 

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The Next Menu

The work of Bad Taste is also on other projects, such as ‘The Next Menu’, a culinary experience aimed at opening our eyes on the future. How we might approach seafood in 30 years’ time, given the disastrous consequences of climate change on the availability of fish. The focus is on organisms that seem to have adapted well to rising water temperatures: artistically the dishes feature some incredible work of art with salt, an ingredient reminding us of the precarious condition of the ocean.

 

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Religiously eating at Januarius - il miracolo del buon gusto

Naples is many things all led by one word the locals have learnt very well to perform in all its variants: folklore. Tourists fell for Naples’ crazy characters and costumes, which in some cases are linked to the ‘veneration’ of saints. This is the case of restaurant Januarius (‘the miracle of good taste’ which was created as ‘place of worship’. The design of the restaurant does resemble the Chapel dedicated to the saint, located in the right nave of the Dome. Francesco Andoli, owner of Januarius, stated in an interview that the he tried to imagine a restaurant that was ‘citational’. The floors are the exact replica of the marbles of the cathedral, with the same motifs, colours and shine.

 

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Dining in the dark: the Bird Box experience, nah?

In a way it is the like the soon best Original Netflix movie starring Sandra Bullock: the idea of creating a sensorial experience that would deprive diners of one of the senses, sight of course, to widen the others was actually a first attempt to create inclusiveness. Dining in the dark is a worldwide project aimed where diners are served food in the dark by blind waiters. The question you have to ask yourself before booking a table is if food really does taste better if you can’t see it; is there a surprise effect? What would be the topic of conversation during such an experience?